Tracks, pathways, ramps and stairs

Tracks and pathways

Key requirements

A continuous accessible path of travel is a fundamental requirement for equitable access to the built environment. This should be provided from any car park, public transport or taxi set down area and property boundary to and through any buildings, facilities, installations and key elements within a site. This route can consist of pathways, roadways, pedestrian crossings and ramps. It cannot incorporate any step, stairway, turnstile, revolving door, escalator, moving walk, or other impediment.

The key requirements of accessible tracks and pathways include:

  • consideration of all modes of pedestrian transport including walking, scooters, wheelchairs, prams, strollers and people with assistance animals
  • wide pathways suitable for the expected volume of pedestrian traffic
  • firm, level, stable, slip resistant, non reflective ground surfaces in both wet and dry conditions. Surfaces including concrete, asphalt or appropriately laid brick paving, well compacted and maintained granitic sand and timber decking are suitable
  • any timber decking and grates laid at right angles to the direction of travel
  • minimal cross falls on pathways that lead users away from any road edge
  • any manholes or service covers installed flush with pathway surface
  • adequate overhead clearance along the entire pathway or track length
  • hazard tactile ground surface indicators at pedestrian and vehicle conflicts
  • wide pathways, suitable where possible for two people using mobility aids to pass each other when approaching from opposite directions
  • wide turning and passing spaces connected to, but set back from the pathway where the pathway cannot provide adequate space
  • bollards installed to ensure parked vehicles do not encroach onto pathways with wide openings and appropriate circulation space on both sides for ease of
  • access by pedestrians
  • landscaping elements that do not create visual confusion within pathway ground surfaces but are incorporated along the edges of pathways to assist with wayfinding, for example, colour contrast edges, low level plantings with specific scents
  • seating and shelter at regular intervals, connected to but setback from the pathways, particularly along longer pathways or tracks and at public transport stops
  • directional tactile ground surface indicators between the pathway and key installations, for example, bicycle storage, drinking fountains and seating
  • a change of ground surface texture or colour within surfaces of pathways at installations, for example, bicycle storage, drinking fountains, seating that helps designate the area
  • ground surfaces along pathway edges, where no kerb and handrail or wall and handrail are available, that are at the same height as the pathway edge
  • clear, concise, easy to read signage, incorporating international symbols of access or deafness, identifying key elements along the track or pathway
  • clear, concise, easy to read signage, incorporating international symbols of access or deafness, identifying shared vehicle and pedestrian pathways indicating designated areas of use
  • where possible, separate pedestrian, vehicle and bicycle paths incorporating clearly defined or marked boundaries
  • a ramp alternative to any steps or stairs on a track or pathway
  • consistent and even lighting (reflected downward - without pooling or producing glare)
  • consistent maintenance regime to eliminate any pot holes, tree roots, overhanging foliage or vegetation or other damage to the track or pathway.

Ramps should incorporate:

  • Gentle gradients
  • Easy to grip handrails
  • Kerbs on both sides
  • Hazard tactile ground surface indicators at the top and bottom
  • Landings of appropriate length and interval
  • Contrasting ground surface to background and adjacent surfaces

Stairs should incorporate:

  • Easy to grip handrails on both sides
  • Contrast nosings on all stair treads
  • Hazard tactile ground surface indicators at the top and bottom
  • Contrasting ground surface to background and adjacent surfaces

Kerb ramps should incorporate:

  • Appropriate grade, length and width
  • Level landings at top and bottom
  • Direct alignment with any opposing kerb ramp and / or median
  • Contrasting colour ground surface to assist with recognition
  • A standard design throughout the area
  • Hazard tactile ground surface indicators where required
  • Installation that follows the direct path of travel

Key access dimensions


 

An example of an accessible track or pathway.Figure 1: Accessible track or pathway

  1. Minimum 30% luminance contrast between track and pathway edges and background and adjacent surfaces
  2. Height minimum of 2000mm
  3. Firm, level, stable ground surface that considers people walking, scooter users, pram user, assistance animals
  4. Minimum preferred width 1800mm

  • A continuous accessible path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high and 1000mm wide for an ambulant person, 1200mm wide for a person using a wheelchair, 1500mm wide for two people to pass each other easily and 1800mm wide for a person using a wheelchair to turn 180°.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Tactile ground surface indicators set back 300mm ± 10mm from any hazard (600 - 800mm deep), extending across width of a path adjoining the hazard, and
  • have a minimum of 30% luminance contrast to the surrounding ground surface and background. (Dimensions for tactile ground surface indicators, both hazard and directional, at specific locations and required luminance contrasts in accordance with Australian Standards.).
  • Minimum 30% luminance contrast between track and pathway edges and background and adjacent surfaces.
  • A minimum of 500mm set back from the track or pathway for bins, seats, lights and bicycle racks.
  • A section at least 1800m wide x 2000mm long every 20m to allow pedestrians to pass each other with ease. A 1500mm x 1500mm space at turns of 90° and 1540 x 2070mm where turns are greater than 90°.
  • Gradient / cross slope on pathways not steeper than 1:40.
  • Where gradients are 1:33, landings at least 1200mm long at maximum intervals of 25m.
  • Where gradients are 1:20, landings at least 1200mm long at maximum intervals of 15m.
  • Maximum cross slope of 1:40 (1:33 acceptable on bitumen walkways, ramps and landings).
  • A maximum grade of 1:14 (1:20 preferred) on any ramp that is greater in length than 1900mm.
  • Ramps incorporating kerbs and handrails on both sides and appropriate landings in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Stairs incorporating nosings and handrails on both sides in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Kerb ramps that have a maximum rise of 190mm, length of 1520mm, grade of 1:8 and a minimum width of 1000mm.
  • Kerb ramps incorporating a level landing at the top and bottom, which considers the direction of travel.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with range in Australian Standards.

Table 1: Relevant Australian Standards for tracks and pathways

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 - 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS/NZS 1428.4:1 - 2009Tactile Ground Surface Indicators for the Orientation of People with Vision Impairment
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
AS/NZS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
AS 2156 - 2001Walking Tracks - Classification and Signage
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information

Ramps

There are a variety of ramps to provide appropriate access to buildings and facilities and throughout the external environment. These include:

  • Step ramp: Not steeper than 1:10 and not longer than 1900mm - often used to replace a step.
  • Threshold ramp: Not steeper than 1:8 and not longer than 280mm - often used at a doorway.
  • Kerb ramp: Not steeper than 1:8 and not longer than 1520mm - often used at a road crossing point.
  • Ramp: Steeper than 1:20 but not steeper than 1:14 – used as a means of access to a wide variety of buildings and facilities.

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel from the property entrance or any onsite car park to any ramp.
  • Clear, easy to read signage to, and at any ramp, incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Identification of the ramp, for example, colour or signage, to assist users to determine their location or level within a building.
  • A gentle grade that allows all users to use the ramp independently.
  • Kerbs on both sides.
  • Adequate width to accommodate expected pedestrian volumes.
  • Hazard tactile ground surface indicators at the top and bottom.
  • A slip resistant surface in wet and dry conditions along the entire length.
  • Low pile carpet (where carpet is installed).
  • Handrails on both sides that are easy to grip and do not create an obstruction to the passage of the hand along the entire handrail.
  • Handrails at appropriate heights that cater for both adults and children.
  • A raised dome on handrails to notify users of the beginning and end of the ramp (where required).
  • Landings and rest areas that include seating on long ramps.
  • An accessible set of stairs or a lift as an alternative to a ramp, for people who do not like or who are unable to walk easily on an angled surface, and appropriate signage to inform users of location of these elements.
  • Ramps which are set back from any property boundary or internal corridor and do not encroach on the transverse path of travel, so as not to interrupt the flow of pedestrian traffic.
  • Shade and shelter over ramps in external areas leading to principal pedestrian entrances.
  • Consistent and even lighting (reflected downward - without pooling or producing glare).

Key access dimensions


 

Side view of a ramp.Figure 2: Side view of a ramp

  1. Height of handrails consistent between 865 – 1000mm above floor level. Ramp length a minimum of 1900mm with a gradient a maximum of 1:14 (1:20 preferred)
  2. Handrails and kerbs on both sides of ramp
  3. Tactile ground surface indicators installed at the bottom of the ramp
  4. Kerbs on both sides of ramps that meet Australian Standard requirements (dependent on construction type)
  5. Setback of ramps a minimum of 900mm at any property boundary and a minimum of 400mm at any internal corridor (refer to Australian Standards)

 

An example of a handrail.Figure 3: Handrail

  1. Clearance from side wall minimum of 50mm
  2. Handrail 30 – 50mm diameter for minimum 270°
  3. Handrails that extend a minimum of 300mm past the top and bottom of any ramp

  • A continuous accessible path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide to any ramp.
  • Ramp length a minimum of 1900mm with a gradient a maximum of 1:14 (1:20 preferred).
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Landings at the top and bottom of ramps and at a minimum of every 9m (6m preferred) on 1:14 grade ramps and every 15m on 1:20 grade ramps.
  • Curve in any ramp at a minimum width of 1500mm.
  • Fixed carpet (where carpet provided) with a pile height or pile thickness not exceeding 11mm and carpet backing thickness not exceeding 4mm.
  • Handrails on both sides with a circular diameter of 30 - 50mm for a minimum of 270° (at the top of the arc), at a consistent height of between 865 - 1000mm, and that extend horizontally for 300mm past the end of the ramp. Ends that return to a side post or wall or downwards through 180º, and fixed or constructed to provide no obstruction to the passage of the hand along the entire rail.
  • Handrails with a minimum clearance of 50mm from an adjacent wall and a minimum clearance of 600mm above the handrail.
  • Handrails with a minimum clearance of 1000mm in between.
  • Handrails with a domed button 4 - 5 mm high x 10 - 12mm dia. provided 150mm from each end (where required).
  • Kerbs on both sides of ramps that meet Australian Standard requirements, (dependent on construction type).
  • Tactile ground surface indicators set back 300mm ± 10mm from the top and bottom of ramp (600 - 800mm deep), extending across the width of a ramp with a minimum of 30% luminance contrast to their adjoining and background surfaces. Hazard indicators installed on ramp landings in accordance with Australian
  • Standards. (Dimensions for tactile ground surface indicators, both hazard and directional, at specific locations and required luminance contrasts in accordance with Australian Standards).
  • Setback of ramps a minimum of 900mm at any property boundary and a minimum of 400mm at any internal corridor.
  • Minimum 30% luminance contrast between ramps, handrails, kerbs and background and adjacent surfaces.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 2: Relevant Australian Standards for ramps

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 - 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS/NZS 1428.4:1 - 2009Tactile Ground Surface Indicators for the Orientation of People with Vision Impairment
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
AS/NZS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
AS 2156 - 2001Walking Tracks - Classification and Signage
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information

Stairs

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel from the property entrance and any onsite car park to stairs as well as an alternative such as a ramp or lift.
  • An alternative to stairs, for example, ramp or lift and appropriate signage to inform users of location.
  • Clear, easy to read signage to stairs incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Identification of the stairs, for example, colour or signage, to assist users to determine their location or level within a building.
  • Adequate width to accommodate expected pedestrian volumes.
  • Consistent tread height throughout stairway to reduce risk of trips / falls.
  • Hazard tactile ground surface indicators at the top and bottom.
  • Slip resistant step treads in wet and dry conditions along the entire stairway.
  • Low pile carpet (where carpet is installed).
  • Handrails on both sides that are easy to grip and do not create an obstruction to the passage of the hand along the entire handrail.
  • Handrails at appropriate heights that cater for both adults and children.
  • A raised dome on handrails to notify users of the beginning and end of the stairway (where required).
  • Rest areas that include seating at landings on long stairways.
  • Stairs which are set back from any property boundary or internal corridor and do not encroach on the transverse path of travel, so as not to interrupt the flow of pedestrian traffic.
  • Shade and shelter over stairs in external areas leading to principal pedestrian entrances.
  • Consistent and even lighting (reflected downward - without pooling or producing glare).

Key access dimensions


 

A side view of stairs.Figure 4: Side view of stairs

  1. Handrails installed at a consistent height of between 865 – 1000mm above floor level
  2. Handrails that are easy to grip along the entire length of the rail
  3. Tactile ground surface indicators at top and bottom of stairs
  4. Provision of 50 – 75mm strip of 30% luminance contrast across the full width of the horizontal component of each stair tread. The strip may be set back a maximum of 15mm from the front of the nosing
  5. Steps with treads between 150 – 165mm high and a minimum depth of 275 – 300mm

  • A continuous accessible path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide to the stairs.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Steps with treads between 150 - 165mm high and a minimum depth of 275 - 300mm.
  • Provision of a 50 - 75mm strip of 30% luminance contrast across the full width of the horizontal component of each stair tread, that if setback from the nosing is no more than 15mm from the front.
  • Enclosed stair risers without any lip overhang and of opaque construction.
  • Fixed carpet (where carpet provided) with a pile height or pile thickness not exceeding 11mm and carpet backing thickness not exceeding 4mm.
  • Tactile ground surface indicators set back 300mm ± 10mm from the top and bottom of stairs (600 - 800mm deep), and have a minimum of 30% luminance contrast to their adjoining and background surfaces. (Dimensions for tactile ground surface indicators, both hazard and directional, at specific locations and required luminance contrasts in accordance with Australian Standards).
  • Handrails on both sides with a circular diameter of 30 - 50mm for a minimum of 270° (at the top of the arc) are at a consistent height of between 865 - 1000mm, and extend horizontally 300mm past the end of the top step and one tread width plus 300mm past the end of the bottom step. Ends are to return to a side post
  • or wall or downwards through 180º, and fixed or constructed to provide no obstruction to the passage of the hand along the entire rail.
  • Handrails with a domed button 4 - 5mm high x 10 - 12mm dia. provided 150mm from each end (where required).
  • Handrails with a minimum clearance of 1000mm in between.
  • Handrails with a minimum clearance of 50mm from an adjacent wall and a minimum clearance of 600mm above the handrail.
  • Setback of stairs a minimum of 900mm at any property boundary and setback in accordance with the Australian Standards at any internal corridor.
  • Minimum 30% luminance contrast between stairs, handrails, and background and adjacent surfaces.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 3: Relevant Australian Standards for stairs

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 - 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS/NZS 1428.4:1 - 2009Tactile Ground Surface Indicators for the Orientation of People with Vision Impairment
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
AS/NZS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
AS 2156 - 2001Walking Tracks - Classification and Signage
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information

Floor and ground surfaces

Key requirements

  • Consideration of all modes of pedestrian transport including walking, scooters, wheelchairs, prams, strollers and people with assistance animals, when selecting floor surface materials.
  • Level, slip resistant, secured floor surfaces in both wet and dry conditions.
  • Non reflective floor surfaces in both wet and dry conditions.
  • Surfaces including concrete, asphalt or appropriately laid brick paving, well compacted and maintained granitic sand or timber decking in outdoor areas.
  • Low pile carpet in internal areas laid in line with the path of travel.
  • Vinyl, timber and synthetic surfaces which are level and slip resistant in wet and dry conditions.
  • Adequate drainage within and along outdoor pathway ground surfaces.
  • Any timber decking and grates laid at right angles to the direction of travel.
  • Any manholes or service covers installed flush with pathway ground surface.
  • A change of ground surface texture or colour within surfaces of pathways at installations, for example, bicycle storage, drinking fountains, seating, that helps designate the area.
  • Accessways with the grade of a walkway, have a ground surface next to the pathway edge which is at the same level as the walkway (where no kerb and handrail; or wall and handrail is available).
  • Joins in floor or ground surfaces that do not produce a lip or tripping hazard.
  • Floor and ground surfaces that do not include use of loose mats.
  • Consistent maintenance regime to eliminate any pot holes, tree roots, damaged carpet or vinyl.

Key access dimensions

  • Fixed carpet (where carpet provided) with a pile height or pile thickness not exceeding 11mm and carpet backing thickness not exceeding 4mm.
  • Floor surface finishes in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.
  • Floor surface connections in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 4: Relevant Australian Standards for floor and ground surfaces

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 - 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS/NZS 1428.4:1 - 2009Tactile Ground Surface Indicators for the Orientation of People with Vision Impairment
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
AS/NZS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
AS 2156 - 2001Walking Tracks - Classification and Signage
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information

Lifts (passenger)

Key access requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel from the building entrance to and into any lift.
  • A clearly signed accessible alternative to any lift, in the event of a lift breakdown.
  • Clear, easy to read signage incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness, that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Lift lobby that is close to the principal building entrance.
  • Lift lobby that is wide enough for all users and caters for various angles of approach, for example, front on, side on.
  • Lift lobby that is large enough (where required) to cater for high volumes of people waiting, without interrupting the flow of pedestrian traffic to the rest of the building.
  • Wide lift entrance doorway, incorporating presence and movement detection sensors, that remains open long enough for ease of entry and exit.
  • Clearly marked safety strip across any fully glazed doors or walls.
  • Lift car that allows a person using a mobility aid, for example, pram, stroller, wheelchair or pulled luggage, to turn 180°.
  • Mirror on the back wall of small lift cars, to assist a person using a mobility aid needing to reverse out of the lift.
  • Floor surfaces that are slip resistant in wet and dry conditions.
  • Low pile carpet (where carpet is installed).
  • Effective contrasts between doorway and adjacent and background surfaces.
  • Non reflective internal walls.
  • Lift buttons located in the same location on each floor level, for example, left of lift car on ground level, level 1, 2 and 3.
  • Lift buttons that are located on both the sides of the lift interior.
  • Visual and tactile elements next to lift buttons.
  • Lift buttons in larger buildings configured in the layout of a telephone keypad, enabling a person to ‘dial up’ their desired floor.
  • Handrails located on the interior rear and side walls of the lift.
  • A lift car that stops accurately at each floor level without a step or gap to the exterior floor surface.
  • Audible announcement or bell at arrival of desired floor.
  • Hearing augmentation system where an inbuilt amplification is installed.
  • Clearly identified emergency buttons and procedures (in alternative formats).
  • Consistent and even lighting (reflected downward - without pooling or providing glare) at the entrance door and within the lift.

Key access dimensions


 

 

 

An inside view of a lift.Figure 5: View from inside a lift

  1. Centre of lift buttons located 900 – 1200mm high
  2. Minimum 900mm clear opening width at lift entrance
  3. Handrails not more than 500mm from any button or operating device
  4. Internal handrail, minimum 600mm long with the top installed 850 – 950mm above floor level, and of an appropriate diameter (30-50mm)and circumference minimum 270°

  • A continuous accessible path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide to the lift.
  • A minimum 900mm clear opening width at lift entrance.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • A minimum floor area 1100 x 1400mm if lift travels less than 12m.
  • A minimum floor area 1400 x 1600mm if lift travels more than 12m.
  • Fixed carpet (where carpet provided) with a pile height or pile thickness not exceeding 11mm and carpet backing thickness not exceeding 4mm.
  • Centre of lift buttons located 900 - 1200mm high.
  • Key pad buttons where provided located 900 - 1100mm above floor level with a tactile marker on the 5.
  • Internal handrail, minimum 600mm long with the top installed 850 - 950mm above floor level, and of an appropriate diameter (30 - 50mm) and circumference minimum 270°.
  • Handrails are to be installed not more than 500mm from any button or operating device.
  • A dwell time at any fully opened lift door a minimum of 6 seconds.
  • Lift travelling more than 12m with an oral identification at each floor called, lifts travelling less than 12m with a tone that sounds when the lift passes or arrives at a floor.
  • Door threshold a maximum of 12mm, either above or below the door sill and the landing sill on any floor level.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 5: Relevant Australian Standards for lifts (passenger)

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 - 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS/NZS 1428.4:1 - 2009Tactile Ground Surface Indicators for the Orientation of People with Vision Impairment
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
AS/NZS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
AS 2156 - 2001Walking Tracks - Classification and Signage
AS 1735Lifts, Escalators and Moving Walks
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information:Floor surfaces

Entrances and doorways

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel from the property entrance and any onsite car park to principal entrances.
  • A range of accessible entrance points in larger buildings.
  • Clear, easy to read signage at entrances, incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Entrances that are visible from any vehicle access routes, set down areas and car parks with appropriate signage that directs users to their desired destination.
  • Path surfaces at entrances with a contrast colour, texture or material to assist with identification of the entrance.
  • Level transition or an appropriate threshold or step ramp at entrances.
  • Wide doorways (self-opening preferred), that are not heavy or hard to open and provide appropriate circulation space at entrances.
  • Effective motion and presence sensors at any automatic opening doors.
  • D or D lever style door handles in contrast to background and adjacent surfaces on all entrance doors where handles are required.
  • Easy to adjust door closers.
  • Door controls that can be reached by a person when standing or seated and used with a closed fist or open palm and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements, for example, entry buzzer and after hours access.
  • Door controls that are located on the path of travel to the door, to allow adequate time when in operation for a person to move fully through the door prior to the door closing.
  • Airlocks at any entrances that allow ease of movement, particularly for people using mobility aids or assistance animals.
  • Alternatives to swing doors where circulation space may be limited, for example, sliding doors.
  • Glazing panels in entrance doors to assist users to view pedestrian traffic from either side.
  • Appropriate safety strip on any fully glazed entrance doors or adjacent fully glazed wall capable of being mistaken as an entrance.
  • Metal kick plate at the bottom of doors to protect against damage by prams, strollers and wheelchairs.
  • Entrance doors that can be opened from the outside of a room in an emergency.
  • Use of screens or baffles at entrances (where appropriate, for example, toilets) that eliminates the need for doors.
  • Effective contrasts between doorways, controls, walls, leading edge of doors and adjacent and background surfaces.
  • Clear, accessible space inside entrances of a building that allows users to adjust to changed lighting conditions within the building interior.
  • Glare free floor surfaces inside any building entrance that may be perceived as being slippery.
  • Seating with backs and armrests that is located near the entrance to a building, and gives clear lines of sight to any taxi zone, set down or waiting area.
  • Shade and shelter at building entrance doors, to allow people to wait out of inclement weather if doors are not open.
  • Shade and shelter at entrances in contrast to background and surrounding surfaces to assist with identification of the entrance.
  • Alternatives to queuing areas at entrances that require people to stand for long periods.
  • Adequate circulation space through queuing areas at entrances for people with mobility aids, for example, prams, wheelchairs.
  • Lighting at entrances that has a higher lux level than the surrounding lighting to assist with identification and safety.

Key access dimensions


 

An example of a door entrance.Figure 6: Door Entrance

  1. Minimum 50mm luminance contrast at entrance
  2. Solid contrast strip on fully glazed doorway / sidelight (window). Height of strip bottom edge 900 – 1000mm above floor level
  3. Minimum clear door opening width 850mm

 

 

 

A D lever style door handle.Figure 7: D lever style door handle

  1. Door handles with 35mm and not more than 45mm clearance between the handle (in the centre) and the back plate or door face
  2. D or D lever style handle with return, installed at a height of 900 – 1100mm above floor level

  • A continuous accessible path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide to entrances.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Any non accessible building entrance to be located not more than 50m away from an accessible entrance.
  • If a pedestrian entrance consists of not more than three doorways - not less than one of those doorways must be accessible.
  • If the pedestrian entrance consists of more than three doorways - not less than 50% of those doorways must be accessible.
  • A minimum 850mm clear opening width at entrances with circulation space on both sides that considers angles of approach and incorporates level landings (including the operative leaf of a multiple leaf door).
  • Maximum rise of 35mm, 280mm length and gradient of 1:8 at any threshold ramps.
  • Step ramps to meet circulation spaces and angles of approach at doorways in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.
  • Solid strip a minimum of 75mm wide installed with the lower edge at a height of 900 - 1000mm above floor level across the width of any fully glazed door or glass wall that could be mistaken for an entrance. A minimum 30% luminance contrast to the background is also required.
  • A maximum force of 20N at the entrance door handle to open doors, and door closers that are adjustable.
  • Any entrance buzzer or intercom 900 - 1100mm high.
  • D type or D type lever style door handles on any doors requiring handles at 900 - 1100mm high.
  • Push button controls that are a minimum of 25m diameter and sit proud of the wall surface.
  • Door controls and switches that need to be grasped or turned at 900 - 1100mm high.
  • Door controls that only need to be touched at a height of 900 – 1250mm and not less than 500mm from an internal corner.
  • Door controls that only need to be pushed, for example, panic bars on egress routes, at a height of 900 - 1200mm.
  • Door controls that are manually operated for power operated entrance doors, at a height of 900 - 1100mm, no closer than 500mm from an internal corner.
  • Door handles with 35mm and not more than 45mm clearance between the handle (in the centre) and the back plate or door face.
  • A pull bar or handrail at a height of between 900 - 1100mm on any outward opening door that is not self closing.
  • Sliding entrance door handles a minimum of 60mm from the door jamb or door stop when closed / open.
  • Snibs with a lever handle a minimum of 45mm from the centre of the spindle.
  • Minimum 30mm x 30mm buttons or switches for entrance controls, proud of surrounding surfaces.
  • A minimum distance of 1450mm between entrance doorways within an airlock or vestibule, plus the door leaf width if the door opens into the space.
  • Minimum 30% luminance contrast between doors, doorway, controls and background and adjacent surfaces.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with Australian Standards.

Table 6: Relevant Australian Standards for entrances and doorways

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 - 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS/NZS 1428.4:1 - 2009Tactile Ground Surface Indicators for the Orientation of People with Vision Impairment
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
AS/NZS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
AS 2156 - 2001Walking Tracks - Classification and Signage
AS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

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