Car parking and associated infrastructure

Car parking

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel to, into and within the parking area and to and around any parking payment machines.
  • A continuous accessible path of travel from the parking bays to any onsite building, facility or installation.
  • Appropriate signage at the site entry directing users to parking areas including location and number of designated accessible parking bays, parking for larger and longer vehicles, rear and side loading vehicles and maintenance vehicles.
  • Designated accessible parking bays, as close as possible to the principal pedestrian entry of the site or building.
  • Easily visible signage at the parking bay incorporating vertical signage, and appropriate ground surface markings, for example, international symbol of access and parents with prams.
  • Adequate overhead clearance at any parking bays and roadways leading to these areas to cater for users with vehicle roof mounted storage containers.
  • Firm, level, slip resistant ground surface in wet and dry conditions at parking bays.
  • In large car parks, separate vehicle entry and exit points to assist with the flow of traffic and speed humps strategically located to increase safety.
  • Parking payment machines that are easy to access and that can be reached by a person when standing or seated.
  • Controls on parking payment machines that can be used with a closed fist or open palm and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Easy to use alternatives to any coin feed points on parking payment machines.
  • Clear, easy to read signage and operating instructions on any parking payment machines incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Shade and shelter over some parking bays, including designated accessible parking bays.
  • Consistent and even lighting at parking bays, parking payment ticket machines and connecting pathways.

Key access dimensions

 

An example of a 90 degree, angled parking bay with disabled access.Figure 1: 90 degree angled car parking bays

  1. Dedicated angled space 2400mm wide and 5400mm long
  2. Overhead clearance on roadways (minimum of 2200mm) and at any designated accessible parking bay (minimum of 2500mm) to allow for use by a vehicle fitted with roof mounted storage device
  3. International Symbol of Access 800 – 1000mm high within a blue rectangle with no side greater than 1200mm, located in the centre of the space 500 – 600mm from its entry
  4. Shared pathway (at grade) 2400mm wide and 5400mm long

Figure 6: Parallel parking bays
 

Figure 2: Parallel parking bays

  1. Minimum length of parking bay and adjoining path of travel 7800mm
  2. Minimum width of adjoining pathway 1600mm
  3. Minimum width of parallel bay 3200mm

  • A continuous accessible pedestrian path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide to car parking and parking payment machines.
  • Overhead clearance on roadways (min. 2200mm) and at any designated accessible parking bay (min. 2500mm) to allow for use by a vehicle fitted with roof mounted storage device.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Appropriate number of parking bays, including designated accessible parking bays, in accordance with the range in relevant Australian Standards.
  • Dedicated space a minimum 3200mm wide and 7800mm long at any designated accessible parallel parking bay with a shared area adjacent to the non-traffic side 1600mm wide x 7800mm long. Shared area may be located at a higher level with an appropriate kerb ramp provided for access.
  • Dedicated space and shared area at one side, a minimum 2400mm wide and 5400mm long at any designated accessible angled parking bay, with a shared area 2400mm long x 2400mm wide at one end of the dedicated space (all at same grade).
  • Identification of designated accessible parking bays through the use of the International Symbol of Access that is marked on the ground 800 - 1000mm high
  • within a blue rectangle with no side greater than 1200mm, located in the centre of the space 500 - 600mm from its entry.
  • Delineation of designated accessible parking bays through the use of unbroken yellow lines 80 - 100mm wide, (except where side has a kerb, barrier or wall) marked with a non slip ground surface material. Markings to shared areas, where required, through the use of unbroken longitudinal lines.
  • Controls on parking payment machines 500 -1200mm high and appropriate reach in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Minimum 30% luminance contrasts between parking payment machines, vertical signage, ground surface markings and background and adjacent surfaces.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 1: Relevant Australian Standards for car parking

NumberTitle
AS/NZS 2890.6 - 2009Parking facilities - Off-street Parking for People with Disabilities
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS/NZS 1428.4.1 - 2009Tactile Ground Surface Indicators for the Orientation of People with Vision Impairment
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information

Set down and waiting areas

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel to, into and within the set down and waiting areas and to and around any installations.
  • A continuous accessible path of travel from set down and waiting areas to any onsite building, facility or installation.
  • Appropriate signage at the site entry directing users to set down and waiting areas including location of areas for larger and longer vehicles and rear and side loading vehicles, maintenance vehicles.
  • Designated accessible set down and waiting area as close as possible to the principal pedestrian entry of the site or building.
  • Set down or waiting areas located so that they do not impede vehicle or pedestrian traffic flow.
  • Easily visible signage at the set down and waiting area incorporating vertical signage and appropriate ground surface markings, for example, international symbol of access and parents with prams.
  • Adequate overhead clearance at any set down and waiting areas and roadways leading to these areas to cater for users with vehicle roof mounted storage containers.
  • Firm, level, slip resistant ground surface in wet and dry conditions at set down and waiting areas.
  • Colour coding and numbering or lettering designating specific set down and waiting zones within large parking areas.
  • In large set down or waiting areas, separate vehicle entry and exit points to assist with the flow of traffic, and speed humps strategically located to increase safety.
  • Seating with backs and armrests that is located near the entry to the building or site or near transparent walls on any enclosed waiting area that gives clear lines of sight to any taxi zone, set down and waiting area.
  • Shade and shelter over some waiting areas.
  • Consistent and even lighting at parking bays, parking payment ticket machines and connecting pathways.

Key access dimensions

  • A continuous accessible pedestrian path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide to any set down or waiting areas and associated installations, for example, payment machines.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Overhead clearance on roadways (min. 2200mm) and at any designated accessible vehicle waiting bay (min. 2500mm) to allow for use by a vehicle fitted with roof mounted storage device.
  • Appropriate number of vehicle waiting bays required for the expected volume of use.
  • Dedicated space a minimum 3200mm wide and 7800mm long at any designated accessible parallel vehicle waiting bay with a shared area adjacent to the non-traffic side 1600mm wide x 7800mm long. Shared area may be located at a higher level with an appropriate kerb ramp provided for access.
  • Dedicated space and shared area at one side, a minimum 2400mm wide and 5400mm long at any designated accessible angled parking bay, with a shared area 2400mm long x 2400mm wide at one end of the dedicated space (all at same grade).
  • Identification of designated accessible vehicle waiting bays through the use of the international symbol of access that is marked on the ground 800 - 1000mm high within a blue rectangle with no side greater than 1200mm, located in the centre of the space 500 - 600mm from its entry.
  • Delineation of designated accessible waiting bays through the use of unbroken yellow lines 80 - 100mm wide (except where side has a kerb, barrier or wall) marked with a non slip ground surface material. Markings to shared areas, where required, through the use of unbroken longitudinal lines.
  • Appropriate reach ranges and controls in accordance with Australian Standards
  • Minimum 30% luminance contrasts between vertical signage, ground surface markings and background and adjacent surfaces.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 2: Relevant Australian Standards for set down and waiting areas

NumberTitle
AS/NZS 2890.6 - 2009Parking facilities - Off-street Parking for People with Disabilities
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS/NZS 1428.4.1 - 2009Tactile Ground Surface Indicators for the Orientation of People with Vision Impairment
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information​

Vehicle guard rails and wheel stops

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel for pedestrians, (including users of mobility aids) around vehicle guard rails and wheel stops.
  • Effective contrasts between vertical and horizontal installations and surfaces.
  • Firm, level, slip resistant ground surfaces in both wet and dry conditions.
  • Appropriate level circulation space around vehicle guard rails and wheel stops.
  • Vehicle guard rails or wheel stops installed to remove overhang of vehicles across pathways.

Key access dimensions

  • A continuous accessible path of travel (that is a minimum 1000mm wide and 2000mm high) to any vehicle guard rail or wheel stop with a minimum of 900mm
  • maintained between vehicle guard rails or wheel stops located next to each other.
  • Minimum 30% luminance contrast between vehicle guard rails and wheel stops and background and adjacent surfaces.
  • Maximum height of 600mm at vehicle guard rails and 150mm at wheel stops.
  • Level circulation space around vehicle guard rails and wheel stops a minimum 800mm x 1350mm at front.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 3: Relevant Australian Standards for vehicle guard rails and wheel stops
 

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS/NZS 1428.4.1 - 2009Tactile Ground Surface Indicators for the Orientation of People with Vision Impairment
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information​

Boom gates and entry control points

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel from the property entrance and any onsite car park to and around any boom gate or entry control point.
  • Boom gate or entry control point located on a firm, level, slip resistant ground surface, in both wet and dry conditions.
  • Space to approach the boom gate or entry control point from both the front and side.
  • Adequate space through any security control for ease of movement by people using mobility aids or assistance animals.
  • Space next to the boom gate or entry control point for a person using a mobility aid to stop without obstructing an adjoining pathway.
  • Clear, easy to read signage and operating instructions, incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Effective contrasts between the boom gate or entry control point and background and adjacent surfaces.
  • Controls that can be reached by a person when standing or seated and used with a closed fist or open palm and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Easy to use alternatives to any coin feed points.
  • Alternatives to queuing areas at entry control points that require people to stand for long periods.
  • Adequate circulation space through queuing areas at entry control points for people with mobility aids, for example, prams and wheelchairs.
  • Shelter and shade over the area if users are required to wait for any length of time.
  • Consistent and even lighting (reflected downward - without pooling or providing glare).
  • Ticket dispensing machines which have no sharp edges and issue a ticket large enough to grasp with ease.

Key access dimensions

 

An example of a boom gate entry control point.Figure 3: Boom gate and entry control point

  1. Tactile elements on buttons – (number ‘5’ as a minimum) if numbers are provided
  2. Alternative accessible path of travel through vehicle area
  3. Controls that are pushed at height of 900 – 1200mm above floor level

  • A continuous accessible path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide, to and through boom gates and entry control points for pedestrians.
  • Signage and operating instructions installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • A minimum 850mm clear opening width at entrances with circulation space on both sides of the entrance which considers angles of approach and incorporates level landings (including the operative leaf of a multiple leaf door).
  • Minimum 30% luminance contrast between boom gate, entry control points, controls and background and adjacent surfaces.
  • Switches and controls that are a minimum of 30mm x 30mm and proud of the surrounding surface.
  • Appropriate reach ranges to any entry control and payment machines in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Controls on boom gates which are pushed 900 -1200mm high.
  • Tactile elements on buttons - number 5 as a minimum, if numbers are provided.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 4: Relevant Australian Standards for boom gate and entry control point

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information

Fences, gates and bollards

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel from the property gate and any onsite car park to principal entry gates.
  • Clear, easy to read signage at gates, incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • A range of accessible gates through fences (where appropriate).
  • Gates that are visible from any vehicle access routes, set down areas and car parks with appropriate signage that directs users to their desired destination.
  • Path surfaces at gates with a contrast colour, texture or material to assist with identification of the gate.
  • Level transition or an appropriate threshold or step ramp at gates.
  • Wide gateways (self-opening preferred), that are not heavy or hard to open and provide appropriate circulation space at gates.
  • Large, easy to use and reach locks and snibs.
  • An alternative means of access if a childproof or safety gate is in use, for example, buzzer, swipe card and master locksmiths key system.
  • Remote controls to operate gates where controls may be difficult to reach.
  • Effective motion and presence sensors at any automatic opening gates.
  • D or D type lever style gate handles in contrast to background and adjacent surfaces on all gates where handles are required.
  • Easy to adjust gate closers.
  • Gate controls that can be reached by a person when standing or seated and used with a closed fist or open palm and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements, for example, entry buzzer and after hours access.
  • Gate controls that are located on the path of travel to the gate, to allow adequate time when in operation for a person to move fully through the gate prior to the gate closing.
  • Airlocks at any gates that allow ease of movement, particularly for people using mobility aids or assistance animals.
  • Alternatives to swing gates where circulation space may be limited, for example, sliding gates.
  • Glazing panels in gates to assist users to view pedestrian traffic from either side.
  • Appropriate safety strip on any fully glazed gates or adjacent fully glazed wall capable of being mistaken as an entrance.
  • Metal kick plate at the bottom of gates to protect against damage by prams, strollers and wheelchairs.
  • Use of screens or baffles at openings in fences (where appropriate for example, toilets) that eliminates the need for gates.
  • Effective contrasts between gateways, controls, walls, leading edge of gates and adjacent and background surfaces.
  • Clear, accessible space inside gates of a facility that allows users to adjust to changed lighting conditions within the facility interior.
  • Glare free floor surfaces (that may be perceived as being slippery), inside any facility gate.
  • Seating with backs and armrests (that is located near the gate to a facility), that gives clear lines of sight to any taxi zone, set down or waiting area.
  • Shade and shelter at gates to allow people to wait out of inclement weather if gates are not open.
  • Shade and shelter at gates in contrast to background and surrounding surfaces to assist with identification of the gate.
  • Alternatives to queuing areas at gates that require people to stand for long periods.
  • Adequate circulation space through queuing areas at gates for people with mobility aids, for example, prams, wheelchairs.
  • Transparent fencing materials that allow lines of sight to be maintained, for example, wire mesh (where appropriate).
  • Use of construction materials that are free from projections and do not splinter or scratch.
  • Bollards that are either square or have a large enough diameter to act as a seat (where required).
  • Lighting at the gate that has a higher lux level than the surrounding lighting to assist with identification and safety.

Key access dimensions

 

an example of a fence and gate with accessible controls.Figure 3: Fence and gate with accessible control

  1. An alternative means of access if a childproof or safety gate is in use, e.g. buzzer, swipe card, master locksmiths, access key etc.
  2. Level transition or an appropriate threshold or step ramp at gate

  • A continuous accessible path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at gateways) and 1000mm wide to gates.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Any non accessible building gate to be located not more than 50m away from an accessible gate.
  • A minimum 850mm clear opening width at entry points in fences or gates and circulation space on both sides of the fence / gate, which considers angles of approach and incorporates level landings (including the operable leaf of a multiple leaf gate).
  • Maximum rise of 35mm, 280mm length and gradient of 1:8 at any threshold ramp at a gateway.
  • Step ramps to meet circulation spaces and angles of approach at gateways in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.
  • Solid strip a minimum of 75mm wide installed across the width of any gate, with the lower edge at a height of 900 - 1000mm above floor level on any fully glazed gate.
  • A maximum force of 20N at the gate handle to open gates and gate closers that are adjustable.
  • Any gate entrance buzzer or intercom 900 - 1100mm high.
  • D or D type lever style gate handles on any gates requiring handles at 900 - 1100mm high.
  • Gate controls that only need to be touched at a height of between 900 - 1250mm and not less than 500mm from an internal corner.
  • Gate controls that only need to be pushed, for example, panic bars on egress routes, located at a height of between 900 - 1200mm.
  • Gate controls and switches that need to be grasped or turned, at 900 - 1100mm high.
  • Gate controls that are manually operated for power operated gates, at a height of 900 - 1100mm, no closer than 500mm from an internal corner.
  • Gate handles with 35mm and not more than 45mm clearance between the handle (in the centre) and the back plate or gate face.
  • A pull bar or handrail at a height of between 900 - 1100mm on any outward opening gate that is not self closing.
  • Manual controls for power operated gates installed at a height of between 900 - 1100mm, no closer than 500mm from an internal corner and between 1000 - 2000mm from any hinged gate leaf and a surface mounted sliding gate in the open position.
  • Minimum 30mm x 30mm buttons or switches for gate controls, proud of surrounding surfaces.
  • Snibs with a lever handle a minimum of 45mm from the centre of the spindle.
  • Sliding gate handles a minimum of 60mm from the gate jamb or gate stop when closed / open.
  • A minimum distance of 1450mm between gateways within an airlock or vestibule, plus the gate leaf width if the gate opens into the space
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Minimum 30% luminance contrast between gates, gateway, controls and background and adjacent surfaces.
  • Bollards that are a minimum of 600mm high and if used as a seat either minimum 300mm diameter or square.

Table 5: Relevant Australian Standards for fences, gates and bollards

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information

Baffles and screens

Baffles can assist with blocking or reducing noise in the environment.

Screens can assist with blocking or reducing vision or views or in some instances act as safety barriers or way finding devices in the environment.

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel from the property entrance and onsite car park to and through any baffles and screens.
  • Clear, easy to read signage, incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness, relating to elements behind baffles and screens, that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements, for example, toilets.
  • Effective contrasts between baffles and screens and background and adjacent surfaces.
  • Consistent and even lighting (reflected downward - without pooling or providing glare).
  • Handrails installed on screens that are secure and easy to grip.

Key access dimensions

  • A continuous accessible path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide to and at any entry points through baffles or screens.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • A minimum 850mm clear opening width at doorway openings in baffles and screens with circulation space provided at both sides that considers angles of approach.
  • Handrails that have a circular diameter of 30 - 50mm for a minimum of 270°, are at a consistent height of between 865 - 1000mm, with a minimum clearance of 50mm from the baffle or screen.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 6: Relevant Australian Standards for baffles and screens
 

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces

Links to other relevant information

Keys, keypads and padlocks

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel to the area where the keypad or padlock is located.
  • Clear, easy to read signage (where required), incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Large colour coded keys that have an easy hold ‘grip’.
  • Use of a master key system in large buildings, limiting the need for multiple keys.
  • Large snibs on any locks.
  • Large buttons incorporating large print on any keypads.
  • Keypads and padlocks that can be reached by a person when standing or seated.
  • Easy to grasp, hold and open padlocks.
  • Keypads, locks that have appropriate clearance from adjacent surfaces and clear, level circulation space around.
  • Alternatives to keys, keypads or padlocks (where possible) with controls that can be used with a closed fist or open palm and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Effective contrasts between doors, gates, key pads and letters and numbers and padlocks and background and adjacent surfaces.
  • Consistent and even lighting (reflected downward - without pooling or providing glare) over key pads and padlocks.

Key access dimensions

 

An example of a gate with a keypad and accessible height controls.Figure 4: Gate with keypad and accessible height controls

  1. Keypads that are located above floor level at a height of between 900 – 1200mm
  2. Door controls e.g. handles, locks located at a height of 900 – 1100mm above floor level

  • A continuous accessible path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide to entrances and keypads and padlocks.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Padlocks which are located above floor level at a height of between 900 - 1100mm.
  • Keypads which are located above floor level at a height of between 900 - 1200mm.
  • Keypads setback a minimum of 500mm from any corner.
  • Snibs that have a lever handle a minimum of 45mm from the centre of the spindle.
  • Circulation spaces around padlocks and keypads that allow for varied angles of approach, for example, front and side.
  • Appropriate reach ranges and controls in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Minimum 30% luminance contrasts between doors, walls, keypads, letters and numbers and padlocks and background and adjacent surfaces.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 7: Relevant Australian Standards for keys, keypads and padlocks

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
AS 1158 - 2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials

Links to other relevant information

Bicycle storage and racks

The following key requirements and key access dimensions for bicycle storage and racks must be considered in addition to those for all installations.

Key requirements

  • Some storage spaces that are large enough to accommodate longer or larger bicycles, for example, hand cycles, tandem bicycles and bicycle with baby trailer.
  • Adequate access to any bicycle hire equipment, for example, helmet dispenser.
  • Coin feed points that are easy to see and reach and alternatives to these where possible.
  • If helmets are provided, sizes to suit both children and adults.
  • Co-located with accessible drinking fountain and seating with backs and arm rests.

Key access dimensions

  • Coin feed slots 800 – 900mm high.
  • Appropriate reach ranges and controls in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Seating with backs and armrests (220 - 300mm above the seat) at a height of 350mm - suitable for children, 450mm - general public use, 520mm - for olderadults.
  • Drinking fountain in accordance with Australian Standards.

Table 8: Relevant Australian Standards for bicycle storage and racks

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities

Links to other relevant information