Buildings

All buildings

There are a number of general key requirements and key access dimensions to consider for all buildings in order to maximise building use for everyone.

General key requirements

A continuous accessible path of travel must be provided from any car park, public transport and taxi set down area and property boundary to and through all buildings, facilities, installations and key elements within a site to support access and use by everyone. This route can consist of pathways, roadways, pedestrian crossings and ramps. It cannot incorporate any step, stairway, turnstile, revolving door, escalator, moving walk or other impediment. Key requirements to consider in all buildings include:

  • if on site parking is provided, an adequate number of a range of parking bays suitable for vehicles of various sizes, uses and utilising various loading systems, that is, side, rear, roof mounted storage
  • clear markings on parking bays indicating specific use, for example, accessible bays, parents with prams and seniors
  • clear, easy to read signage at the entry to, and within any building incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness, that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated, and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements
  • an adequate number of accessible pedestrian entrances
  • signage at any non accessible entrances indicating closest accessible entrances
  • wide, level transition or an appropriate threshold or step ramp at entrances as well as at all doors, doorways and exit points of the building
  • wide doorways (automatic self - opening doors and sliding doors where possible) that are not heavy or hard to open and incorporate appropriate circulation space
  • level, slip resistant floor surfaces in wet and dry conditions, incorporating low pile carpet (in any areas where carpet is installed)
  • clearly marked contrasting safety strips across the full width of any fully glazed doors or walls
  • vision panels in doors that allow viewing from either side of the door by a person when standing or seated
  • controls on doors, appliances, equipment, fire alarms and extinguishers, lighting, power outlets and other installations that can be reached by a person when standing or seated and used with a closed fist or open palm, and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements
  • wide corridors free from any side or overhead obstructions
  • remote controls to operate any equipment and appliances that may be difficult to reach
  • customer service counters, benches, sinks and other installations that incorporate appropriate low heights and leg clearance underneath
  • effective acoustic environment at any staff interaction areas
  • information stands and notice boards in locations that do not limit pedestrian movement and that can be reached by a person when standing or seated
  • hearing augmentation where inbuilt amplification is installed in any auditorium, hall, meeting or conference room, where a public address system is installed, or at any ticket office, enquiry, cashier or reception area where the public is screened from the service provider
  • effective contrasts between vertical and horizontal surfaces around doors, door frames, equipment, benches, counters or other installations
  • movable, firm furniture, including chairs and seating with backs and armrests
  • lifts or ramps as an alternative to stairs
  • lifts with wide door openings, adequate circulation space, audio announcements and controls incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements
  • ramps that incorporate appropriate gradients and surfaces as well as handrails and kerbs on both sides
  • steps and stairs that incorporate firm, level slip resistant surfaces, edge nosings, opaque risers and handrails on both sides
  • hazard tactile ground surface indicators prior to kerb ramps (where required), steps, ramps, moving walks, escalators, lifts or as a warning of any overhead hazard
  • an adequate number of appropriate toilets for all building users including people with mobility challenges, for example, ambulant and unisex accessible toilets
  • if provided in any building, showers that include a unisex accessible facility
  • emergency exits (in addition to principal pedestrian entry points) that are wide, level, well signed and provide a continuous accessible path of travel from the building to any nominated emergency assembly areas
  • audible and visible emergency alarms
  • emergency Evacuation Plans displayed so that they can be read by a person when standing or seated, identifying the location of accessible paths of travel to nominated assembly areas for both ambulant and non ambulant building users
  • consistent and even lighting (reflected downward - without pooling or providing glare) throughout the building, including at entry and exit points, customer service areas, toilet facilities, ramps, steps or stairs and over other installations.

Table 1: Relevant Australian Standards for all buildings
 

NumberTitle
AS/NZS 2890.6 - 2009Parking facilities - Off-street Parking for People with Disabilities
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 1428.3 – 1992
Obsolescent June 2012
Design for access and mobility - Requirements for Children and Adolescents with Physical Disabilities
AS/NZS 1428.4.1 - 2009Tactile Ground Surface Indicators for the Orientation of People with Vision Impairment
AS 1428.5Design for access and mobility - Communication for People who are Deaf or Hearing Impaired
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
AS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
AS 1735Lifts, Escalators and Moving Walks
AS 1670.4 - 2004Fire detection system design, installation and commissioning - Sound Systems and Intercom Systems for Emergency Purposes
AS 2293.1 - 2005Emergency escape lighting and exit signs for buildings - System Design, Installation and Operation
AS 4428.4 -2004Fire detection, warning, control and intercom systems - Control and Indicating Equipment - Intercommunication Systems for Emergency Purposes
AS 3745 - 2010Planning for emergencies in facilities
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information regarding specific buildings​

Entrances and doorways

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel from the property entrance and any onsite car park to principal entrances.
  • A range of accessible entrance points in larger buildings.
  • Clear, easy to read signage at entrances, incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Entrances that are visible from any vehicle access routes, set down areas and car parks with appropriate signage that directs users to their desired destination.
  • Path surfaces at entrances with a contrast colour, texture or material to assist with identification of the entrance.
  • Level transition or an appropriate threshold or step ramp at entrances.
  • Wide doorways (self-opening preferred), that are not heavy or hard to open and provide appropriate circulation space at entrances.
  • Effective motion and presence sensors at any automatic opening doors.
  • D or D lever style door handles in contrast to background and adjacent surfaces on all entrance doors where handles are required.
  • Easy to adjust door closers.
  • Door controls that can be reached by a person when standing or seated and used with a closed fist or open palm and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements, for example, entry buzzer and after hours access.
  • Door controls that are located on the path of travel to the door, to allow adequate time when in operation for a person to move fully through the door prior to the door closing.
  • Airlocks at any entrances that allow ease of movement, particularly for people using mobility aids or assistance animals.
  • Alternatives to swing doors where circulation space may be limited, for example, sliding doors.
  • Glazing panels in entrance doors to assist users to view pedestrian traffic from either side.
  • Appropriate safety strip on any fully glazed entrance doors or adjacent fully glazed wall capable of being mistaken as an entrance.
  • Metal kick plate at the bottom of doors to protect against damage by prams, strollers and wheelchairs.
  • Entrance doors that can be opened from the outside of a room in an emergency.
  • Use of screens or baffles at entrances (where appropriate, for example, toilets) that eliminates the need for doors.
  • Effective contrasts between doorways, controls, walls, leading edge of doors and adjacent and background surfaces.
  • Clear, accessible space inside entrances of a building that allows users to adjust to changed lighting conditions within the building interior.
  • Glare free floor surfaces inside any building entrance that may be perceived as being slippery.
  • Seating with backs and armrests that is located near the entrance to a building, and gives clear lines of sight to any taxi zone, set down or waiting area.
  • Shade and shelter at building entrance doors, to allow people to wait out of inclement weather if doors are not open.
  • Shade and shelter at entrances in contrast to background and surrounding surfaces to assist with identification of the entrance.
  • Alternatives to queuing areas at entrances that require people to stand for long periods.
  • Adequate circulation space through queuing areas at entrances for people with mobility aids, for example, prams, wheelchairs.
  • Lighting at entrances that has a higher lux level than the surrounding lighting to assist with identification and safety.

Key access dimensions


 

An example of a door entrance.Figure 1: Door entrance

  • Minimum 50mm luminance contrast at entrance
  • Solid contrast strip on fully glazed doorway/sidelight (window). Height of strip bottom edge 900 – 1000mm above floor level
  • Minimum clear door opening width 850mm

 

 

 

D lever style door handle.Figure 2: D lever style door handle

  1. Doorhandles with 35mm and not more than 45mm clearance between the handle (in the centre) and the back plate or door face
  2. D or D lever style handle with return, installed at a height of 900 – 1100mm above floor level

 

  • A continuous accessible path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide to entrances.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Any non accessible building entrance to be located not more than 50m away from an accessible entrance.
  • If a pedestrian entrance consists of not more than three doorways - not less than one of those doorways must be accessible.
  • If the pedestrian entrance consists of more than three doorways - not less than 50% of those doorways must be accessible.
  • A minimum 850mm clear opening width at entrances with circulation space on both sides that considers angles of approach and incorporates level landings (including the operative leaf of a multiple leaf door).
  • Maximum rise of 35mm, 280mm length and gradient of 1:8 at any threshold ramps.
  • Step ramps to meet circulation spaces and angles of approach at doorways in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.
  • Solid strip a minimum of 75mm wide installed with the lower edge at a height of 900 - 1000mm above floor level across the width of any fully glazed door or glass wall that could be mistaken for an entrance. A minimum 30% luminance contrast to the background is also required.
  • A maximum force of 20N at the entrance door handle to open doors, and door closers that are adjustable.
  • Any entrance buzzer or intercom 900 - 1200mm high.
  • D type or D type lever style door handles on any doors requiring handles at 900 - 1100mm high.
  • Push button controls that are a minimum of 25m diameter and sit proud of the wall surface.
  • Door controls and switches that need to be grasped or turned at 900 - 1100mm high.
  • Door controls that only need to be touched at a height of 900 – 1250mm and not less than 500mm from an internal corner.
  • Door controls that only need to be pushed, for example, panic bars on egress routes, at a height of 900 - 1200mm.
  • Door controls that are manually operated for power operated entrance doors, at a height of 900 - 1100mm, no closer than 500mm from an internal corner.
  • Door handles with 35mm and not more than 45mm clearance between the handle (in the centre) and the back plate or door face.
  • A pull bar or handrail at a height of between 900 - 1100mm on any outward opening door that is not self closing.
  • Sliding entrance door handles a minimum of 60mm from the door jamb or door stop when closed / open.
  • Snibs with a lever handle a minimum of 45mm from the centre of the spindle.
  • Minimum 30mm x 30mm buttons or switches for entrance controls, proud of surrounding surfaces.
  • A minimum distance of 1450mm between entrance doorways within an airlock or vestibule, plus the door leaf width if the door opens into the space.
  • Minimum 30% luminance contrast between doors, doorway, controls and background and adjacent surfaces.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with Australian Standards.

Table 2: Relevant Australian Standards for entrances and doorways

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
AS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
Disability (Access to Premises Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information

Internal corridors

Key requirements

A continuous accessible path of travel must be provided from the building entry to and through the facility providing access to all facilities including customer service areas, multipurpose rooms, toilets, activity spaces and installations. This route cannot incorporate any step, stairway, turnstile, revolving door, escalator, moving walk or other impediment. The key requirements of accessible internal corridors include:

  • wide corridors with firm, level, stable, slip resistant floor surfaces in both wet and dry conditions
  • a level transition or an appropriate threshold or step ramp at corridor entrances
  • low pile carpet (where carpet is installed)
  • appropriate safety strip on any fully glazed door or wall in a corridor capable of being mistaken as an entrance
  • switches and power outlets on walls that horizontally align with door handles and other controls on walls
  • turning spaces where it is not possible to continue to the end of a walkway or corridor
  • passing spaces where a direct line of sight is not available to the end of the walkway or corridor
  • effective contrasts between doorways, walls and adjacent and background surfaces
  • any stairs or ramps, including handrails, set back so they do not encroach into the corridor.

Key access dimensions


 

Overhead view of an accessible internal corridor.Figure 3: Acessible internal corridor

 

  1. A minimum 850mm clear opening width at doorways with circulation space provided at both sides that considers angles of approach
  2. Passing spaces provides at a maximum of 20m intervals (refer to Australian Standards)
  3. A continuous accessible path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide

  • A continuous accessible path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide.
  • A minimum 850mm clear opening width at doorways with circulation space provided at both sides that considers angles of approach.
  • Fixed carpet (where carpet provided) with a pile height or pile thickness not exceeding 11mm and carpet backing thickness not exceeding 4mm.
  • A maximum interval of 20m at any passing space. Size of passing spaces is dependent on angle of walkways or corridors.
  • Turning spaces within 2m of the end of a walkway or corridor where it is not possible to continue.
  • Maximum rise of 35mm, 280mm length and gradient of 1:8 at any threshold ramp at a doorway.
  • Step ramps to meet circulation spaces and angles of approach at doorways.
  • Solid strip a minimum of 75mm wide installed with the lower edge at a height of 900 - 1000mm above floor level across the full width of any fully glazed door or wall that could be mistaken for an entrance.
  • A ramp or stair setback a minimum of 400mm at any internal corridor.
  • Appropriate reach ranges and controls in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 3: Relevant Australian Standards for internal corridors

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information

Multipurpose rooms

The following key requirements and access dimensions for multipurpose rooms must be read in conjunction with key requirements and key access dimensions for all buildings and all installations.

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel from the site entry to and through any multipurpose room.
  • Clear, easy to read signage at the entry to the multipurpose room incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness, that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Clear, concise signage with a large size number or name at the entrance to the multipurpose room.
  • Wide waiting areas outside the multipurpose room to enable people to wait outside without interrupting the flow of pedestrian traffic through the rest of the building.
  • A low height bench and sink (if installed in the multipurpose room) that incorporates appropriate leg clearance underneath.
  • A hearing augmentation system where an inbuilt amplification system is installed.
  • Lever or sensor operated taps in any wet areas.
  • Hot water, tea, coffee making facilities that can be used by a person when standing or seated.
  • Podium or stage with appropriate level or ramp access.
  • Podium or stage that is large enough for people using a mobility aid or assistance animal to undertake a presentation effectively.
  • Adjustable height microphone and lectern with easy to use controls.
  • Long connection leads for lap top computer and data projector to ensure laptop can be seen and used from the presenter’s table.
  • Televisions that incorporate closed captioning functions.
  • Controls on appliances, equipment, lighting and power outlets that can be reached by a person when standing or seated and used with a closed fist or open palm and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Remote controls to operate any equipment and appliances, including presentation devices that may be difficult to reach.
  • Accessible storage area for mobility aids and recreational equipment.
  • A range of appropriate recreation equipment that considers the needs of all potential users.
  • Movable, firm furniture, including chairs with backs and armrests.
  • Access to ‘break out’ rooms associated with any multipurpose room.
  • Access to outdoor spaces and rooms associated with any multipurpose room.
  • Shade and shelter over any outdoor spaces associated with multipurpose rooms.
  • Access to appropriate toilets for all users including people with mobility challenges, for example, ambulant and unisex accessible toilets.

Key access dimensions


 

Room set up with accessible stage/podium and seatingFigure 4: Room set up with a stage/podium and seating

  1. Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards
  2. Height adjustable lectern
  3. Ramp / stair access to stage / podium
  4. Tables that are of varying heights 730 – 870mm above floor level with appropriate leg clearance underneath

  • A continuous accessible pedestrian path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • A minimum 850mm clear opening width at doorways with circulation space provided at both sides that considers angles of approach.
  • Hearing augmentation that covers 80% of the floor area served by inbuilt amplification or 95% of the space if a system using receivers or the like is in use.
  • Tables that are of varying heights 730 - 870mm above floor level with appropriate leg clearance underneath.
  • Kitchen sink 770 - 800mm high with 640 - 650mm leg clearance underneath
  • Tea and Coffee facilities with highest operable components at 900 - 1100mm.
  • Maximum 1:14 (1:20 preferred) ramp or 1:10 step ramp to any stage and podium.
  • Seating with backs and armrests (220 - 300mm above the seat) at a height of 350mm - suitable for children, 450mm - general public use, 520mm - for older adults).
  • Appropriate reach ranges and controls in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 4: Relevant Australian Standards for multipurpose rooms

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information

Play spaces

The following key requirements and access dimensions for play spaces must be read in conjunction with key requirements and key access dimensions for all buildings and all installations.

Key access requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel from the site entry to and through any play space.
  • Clear, easy to read signage at the entry to the play space incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness, that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Alternatives to locks on child proof gates on accessible paths of travel to the entry, for example, buzzer or swipe card.
  • Controls on equipment that can be reached by a person when standing or seated and used with a closed fist or open palm and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Play components that cater for the expected age of users and their developmental needs, for example, physical or active play, cognitive play, social play.
  • Soft fall surface materials that can be accessed by all users, for example, adult, child or person using a wheelchair around play components.
  • Minimum of one of each play component type which is accessible, for example, swing, slide and sand pit.
  • Seating with backs and armrests provided in a variety of configurations and heights that are accessible to adults and children and are located within viewing range of the play components.
  • Drinking fountains that are accessible from a standing or seated position.
  • Shade and shelter over some seating and play components.

A range of play elements and components suitable for people of all ages including:

  • multipurpose play activities such as sand diggers, climbing equipment, ball courts, cubbies or swings
  • interesting places or surfaces that suggest particular games or encourage activities such as rolling, hiding or running
  • vegetation, sand or loose materials that invite building, collecting or creative imaginative play
  • elements that provide acceptable risk, changes in surfaces and sensory elements that include tactile, audible and olfactory components.
  • Access to appropriate toilets for all users including people with mobility challenges, for example, ambulant and unisex accessible toilets.

Key access dimensions

  • A continuous accessible path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high and 1000mm wide for an ambulant person, 1200mm wide for a person using a wheelchair, 1500mm wide for two people to pass each other easily and 1800mm wide for a person using a wheelchair to turn 180° to and through the area connecting all facilities.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Any entrance buzzer or intercom on a childproof gate 900 - 1200mm high.
  • Minimum 850mm clear opening width at doors / gates and circulation space on both sides of doors that considers angles of approach and incorporates level landings
  • Level circulation space around all installations.
  • Seating with backs and armrests (220 - 300mm above the seat) at a height of 350mm - suitable for children, 450mm - general public use, 520mm - for older adults).
  • 1900mm x 2300mm to a height of 2000mm minimum pan circulation space incorporating appropriate fixtures and fitting installation in any accessible toilet.
  • Appropriate reach ranges and controls in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 5: Relevant Australian Standards for play spaces

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 1428.3 – 1992
Obsolescent June 2012
Design for access and mobility - Requirements for Children and Adolescents with Physical Disabilities
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
AS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
AS 4685 - 2004Playground equipment safety set

Links to other relevant information

Retail areas

The following key requirements and access dimensions for retail areas must be read in conjunction with key requirements and key access dimensions for all buildings and all installations.

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel from the site entry to and through any retail area.
  • Clear, easy to read signage at the entry to the retail area incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness, that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Assistance Animals Welcome sticker at entry.
  • Alternatives to queuing areas that require people to stand for long periods, for example, buzzer or vibrating personal alarms.
  • Adequate circulation space through queuing areas and aisles for people with mobility aids, for example, prams and wheelchairs.
  • Self serve checkout and payment points that are easy to understand, operate and access for a person when standing or seated.
  • Low height customer service counters, benches and other installations that incorporate appropriate leg clearance around and underneath.
  • An easy to reach and see customer service buzzer installed on any customer service counter.
  • A hearing augmentation system where an inbuilt amplification is installed, including at any customer service counter that is screened from the public.
  • Effective acoustic environment at staff interaction areas.
  • Glare free backgrounds to customer service areas.
  • Clear, easy to read, large print product lists and price tags.
  • Easy to access condiments, cutlery and serviettes that don’t require a person to ‘pinch or squeeze’.
  • Long reach cord on any EFT machine.
  • Easy to see, reach and use vending machines.
  • ATMs where stand-alone, that cater for all people, for example, short stature, vision impaired, and that have a clear screen transaction area and audio capacity.
  • ATM cash dispenser drawers which are easy to reach, use and see.
  • Brochures and information provided in locations that can be reached by a person when standing or seated.
  • Movable, firm furniture, including chairs with backs and armrests.
  • Various height tables.
  • Signage above each aisle detailing items available.
  • Self serve and shelving items that can be reached by a person when standing or seated.
  • Heavy items located on lower shelving.
  • Baskets and trolleys suitable for use by a range of people including an adult with a child and mobility aid.
  • Fitting rooms that are large enough to accommodate all users, including a person with a companion, a person with assistance animal or using a mobility aid.
  • Shade and shelter over any outdoor display spaces.
  • Access to appropriate toilets for all users including people with mobility challenges, for example, ambulant and unisex accessible toilets.

Key access dimensions


 

Side view of a front counter at a leisure setting.Figure 5: Front counter at a leisure centre setting

  1. Maintenance of a clear line of sight between customer service officer and customer
  2. Any customer service buzzer or intercom within common reach ranges in accordance with Australian Standards
  3. EFT cord 1100mm minimum length

  • A continuous accessible pedestrian path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • A minimum 850mm clear opening width at doorways with circulation space provided at both sides that considers angles of approach.
  • Any customer service buzzer or intercom within common reach ranges in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Customer service counter 830 - 870mm high with a leg clearance underneath of 800 - 840mm for a minimum of 900mm.
  • EFT cord 1100mm minimum length.
  • ATM cash dispenser drawer that has a maximum depth and width of 70mm, and a minimum height of 70mm.
  • Hearing augmentation that covers 80% of the floor area served by inbuilt amplification or 95% of the space if a system using receivers or the like is in use. The number of receivers in use depends on the number of people that the space accommodates.
  • Seating with backs and armrests (220 - 300mm above the seat) at a height of 350mm - suitable for children, 450mm - general public use, 520mm - for older adults.
  • Appropriate reach ranges and controls in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 6: Relevant Australian Standards for retail areas

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
AS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement 
Australian Bankers Association - Industry Standard - Automatic Teller Machines
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information

Scoring areas

The following key requirements and access dimensions for scoring areas must be read in conjunction with key requirements and key access dimensions for all buildings and all installations.

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel from the site entry to and through any scoring area.
  • Clear, easy to read signage at the entry to the scoring area incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness, that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Scoring sheets in large, clear font for ease of use.
  • Scoring numbers and letter displays that can be seen from all spectator locations within the facility.
  • Effective contrasts between numbers or letters and adjacent surfaces.
  • Low height scoring benches with adequate space and leg clearance underneath.
  • Scoring systems and equipment incorporating large controls that can be used by a closed fist or open palm.
  • Scoring systems and equipment that can be used by a person when standing or seated.
  • Visible and audible scoring systems and displays.
  • Screens or scoreboards that are capable of displaying public announcements to supplement a public address system.
  • Adjustable height microphone with easy to use controls at scoring areas where announcements are made.
  • Long connection leads for laptop computer or other scoring and recording equipment to enable use at the scorer’s bench if required.
  • Controls on appliances, scoring equipment, lighting and power outlets that can be reached by a person when standing or seated and used with a closed fist or open palm and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Remote controls to operate any scoring equipment and appliances that may be difficult to reach.
  • Movable, firm furniture, including seats with backs and armrests.
  • Shade and shelter over any external areas where scorers are required to operate from.
  • Access to appropriate toilets for all users including people with mobility challenges, for example, ambulant and unisex accessible toilets.

Key access dimensions

  • A continuous accessible pedestrian path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Height of letters / numbers on scoreboards that consider viewing distances in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • A minimum 850mm clear opening width at doorways with circulation space provided at both sides that considers angles of approach.
  • Large print 18 point Arial or Helvetica font on appliance, control instructions and on scoring numbers and letters.
  • Hearing augmentation that covers 80% of the floor area served by inbuilt amplification or 95% of the space if a system using receivers or the like is in use.
  • 830 - 870mm high score benches with a leg clearance underneath of 800 – 840mm.
  • Seating with backs and armrests (220 - 300mm above the seat) at a height of 350mm - suitable for children, 450mm - general public use, 520mm - for older adults).
  • 1900mm x 2300mm to a height of 2000mm minimum pan circulation space incorporating appropriate fixtures and fitting installation in any accessible toilet.
  • Appropriate reach ranges and controls in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 7: Relevant Australian Standards for scoring areas

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 1428.5 - 2010Design for access and mobility - Communication for people who are deaf or hearing impaired
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information

Spectator and viewing areas

The following key requirements and access dimensions for spectator and viewing areas must be read in conjunction with key requirements and key access dimensions for all buildings and all installations.

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel from the site entry to and through any spectator and viewing area.
  • Clear, easy to read signage at the entry to the spectator and viewing area incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness, that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Viewing areas connected to, but located off the continuous accessible path of travel, so as not to provide an obstruction to path users.
  • A raised viewing area for people who need to remain seated, in areas where viewing is predominantly undertaken by people who are standing.
  • Accessible seating spaces available in a variety of equitable locations throughout a building or facility, that allow people to sit together, for example, friends and family, person using a wheelchair and person using an assistance animal.
  • Rows of seating that have adequate space between them to allow people to easily move through.
  • Additional space available next to seating that will allow a person to store items, for example, wheeled luggage and assistance animal.
  • Range of seating with backs and armrests.
  • Various height seating suitable for children and adults.
  • Removable seating with backs and armrests provided in areas of fixed seating.
  • Viewing areas that provide clear lines of sight to activities, events or a scene being viewed.
  • Accessible paths, ramps, stairs and seating at any temporary viewing area.
  • An appropriate kerb and handrail on any raised viewing platform to prevent people from falling or rolling over an edge.
  • Where relevant, accessible viewing spaces for people sitting in vehicles, who may have difficulty in leaving the vehicle.
  • Alternatives to viewing areas that cannot be accessed by all people, for example, provision of interpretative elements such as audio visual presentations, displays or architectural models, thermoforms and live television links.
  • A hearing augmentation system where an inbuilt amplification system is installed.
  • Shade and shelter over some viewing and spectator areas that are located outdoors.
  • Access to appropriate toilets for all users including people with mobility challenges, for example, ambulant and unisex accessible toilets.

Key access dimensions

 

An example of a spectator viewing area.Figure 6: Spectator area

  1. Seating with backs and armrests (220 – 300mm above the seat) e.g. at a height of 350mm suitable for children, 450mm – general public use, 520mm – for older adults
  2. Wheelchair spaces that are a minimum of 850mm wide (800mm acceptable if located at the end of a row) and a minimum of 1250mm deep
  3. A minimum 300mm kerb on raised viewing platforms where required for safety

  • A continuous accessible pedestrian path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • A minimum 850mm clear opening width at doorways with circulation space provided at both sides that considers angles of approach.
  • A minimum 300mm kerb on raised viewing platforms where required for safety.
  • Hearing augmentation that covers 80% of the floor area served by inbuilt amplification or 95% of the space if a system using receivers or the like is in use.
  • Wheelchair spaces that are a minimum of 850mm wide (800mm acceptable if located at the end of a row) and a minimum of 1250mm deep (rear approach) 2450mm deep (front approach). Fixed wheelchair seating spaces located within a building are to be provided in numbers and sizes that are dependent on their location, the size of the room and their approach.
  • Seating with backs and armrests (220 - 300mm above the seat) at a height of 350mm - suitable for children, 450mm - general public use, 520mm - for older adults).
  • Appropriate reach ranges and controls in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 8: Relevant Australian Standards for spectator and viewing areas

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information

Customer service areas

The following key requirements and key access dimensions for customer service areas must be read in conjunction with key requirements and key access dimensions for all buildings and all installations.

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel from the site entry to and through any customer service area.
  • Clear, easy to read signage at the entry to the customer service area incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness, that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Assistance Animals Welcome sticker at entry.
  • Alternatives to queuing areas that require people to stand for long periods, for example, buzzer or vibrating personal alarms.
  • Adequate circulation space through queuing areas for people with mobility aids, for example, prams, wheelchairs.
  • Low height customer service counters, benches and other installations that incorporate appropriate leg clearance around and underneath.
  • An easy to reach and see customer service buzzer installed on any customer service counter.
  • Long reach cord on any EFT machine.
  • A hearing augmentation system where an inbuilt amplification is installed at any customer service counter that is screened from the public.
  • Effective acoustic environment at staff interaction areas, for example, if provided, low level background music that is appropriate for all users.
  • Glare free backgrounds to customer service areas.
  • Remote controls to operate all equipment and appliances that may be difficult to reach, for example, photocopiers and televisions.
  • Brochures provided in locations that can be reached by a person when standing or seated.
  • Various height or adjustable tables if meetings are conducted in the area.
  • Any self serve and shelving items that are can be reached by a person who is standing or seated.
  • Movable, firm furniture, including chairs with backs and armrests.
  • Carpet or tiling laid to assist with way finding to the customer service area.
  • Easy to see, reach and use vending machines, for example, ticket dispensers in queues that can be used by a person when standing or seated.
  • Visible and audible alternatives for announcements and notifications.
  • Access to appropriate toilets for all users including people with mobility challenges, for example, ambulant and unisex accessible toilets.

Key access dimensions


 

Side view of a counter in a customer service setting.Figure 7: Front counter in a customer service setting

  1. Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards
  2. Any customer service buzzer or intercom within common reach ranges in accordance with Australian Standards
  3. Controls on any vending machine 500 – 1200 high above floor level
  4. Customer service counter, benches or tables with a leg clearance underneath of 800 – 840mm
  5. Customer service counter, benches or tables 830 – 870mm high for a minimum of 900mm

  • A continuous accessible pedestrian path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • A minimum 850mm clear opening width at doorways with circulation space provided at both sides that considers angles of approach.
  • Any customer service buzzer or intercom, display and information stands within common reach ranges in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Customer service counter, benches or tables 830 - 870mm high with a leg clearance underneath of 800 - 840mm for a minimum of 900mm.
  • Hearing augmentation that covers 80% of the floor area served by inbuilt amplification or 95% of the space if a system using receivers or the like is in use. The number of receivers in use depends on the number of people that the space accommodates.
  • Signage installed indicating the area covered by a hearing augmentation system, that is, 80 or 95%, the type of system that is in place, and if receivers or the like are in use, the location where the receivers can be obtained.
  • Controls on any vending machine 500 – 1200mm high.
  • EFT cord 1100mm minimum length.
  • Seating with backs and armrests (220 - 300mm above the seat) at a height of 350mm - suitable for children, 450mm - general public use, 520mm - for older adults.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 9: Relevant Australian Standards for customer service areas

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
AS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information

Hearing augmentation

The following key requirements and key access dimensions for hearing augmentation must be read in conjunction with key requirements and key access dimensions for all buildings and all installations.

Key requirements

  • Hearing augmentation provided where inbuilt amplification is installed in any auditorium, hall, meeting or conference room, or lift, where a public address system is installed.
  • Hearing augmentation provided at any ticket office, enquiry, cashier or reception area where the public is screened from the service provider.
  • Signage indicating the area covered by the hearing augmentation system incorporating the international symbol of deafness, for ease of identification by users.
  • Type of hearing augmentation system, in other words, can be built-in or portable that can be moved from room to room, is dependent on the size of the area to be covered, as well as potential external influences, for example, excessive noise.
  • Acoustic design elements in buildings and facilities that assist in reducing background noise, particularly in indoor areas such as reception counters, public meeting areas, social interchange points, information and cashier areas.
  • Provision of the following installations to minimise background noise levels within buildings:
  • rubber tips on furniture legs
  • soft furnishings
  • low pile carpet
  • heavy curtains and wall hangings
  • automatic doors closures
  • double glazing on windows
  • use of shrubs, trees or high, solid fences to limit traffic noise
  • provision of quiet areas for conversations with users
  • quiet air conditioners, fans and office equipment
  • acoustic treatments to walls and ceilings.
  • Seating with backs and armrests that provides good lines of sight to speakers, presenters or performers to assist people who may be lip reading.
  • Visible emergency alarms, in addition to audible emergency alarms.
  • Controls for hearing augmentation that can be reached by a person when standing or seated and used with a closed fist or open palm and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Consistent and even lighting over the space covered by any hearing augmentation (reflected downward - without pooling or providing glare).
  • Provision of ‘sign language interpreters’ at public meetings and performances, as required.
  • Provision of management practices to ensure noise generated by specific activities (exercise classes, aerobics and social activities) is limited and contained to reduce the impact inside and outside premises.
  • Provision of captions or text information on any visual or audible data presentations, for example, DVDs, TVs, scoreboards and notice boards.

Key access dimensions


 

Braille and tactile signage indicating presence of a hearing loop.Figure 8: Braille and tactile signage indicating presence of a hearing loop

  1. Signage including the international symbol for deafness indicating the area covered by a hearing augmentation system, as per Australian Standards

  • A continuous accessible path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide.
  • Signage and operating instructions installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Hearing augmentation that covers 80% of the floor area served by inbuilt amplification, or 95% of the space if a system using receivers or the like is in use. The number of receivers in use depends on the number of people that the space accommodates.
  • Signage including the international symbol for deafness indicating the area covered by a hearing augmentation system, that is, 80 or 95%, the type of system that is in place, and if receivers or the like are in use and the location where the receivers can be obtained.
  • Provision of hearing augmentation that meets the field strengths required by Australian Standards.
  • Minimum 30% luminance contrast between hearing augmentation system controls and background and adjacent surfaces.
  • Appropriate reach ranges and controls in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Lighting to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 10: Relevant Australian Standards for hearing augmentation

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 1428.5Design for access and mobility - Communication for People who are Deaf or Hearing Impaired
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS 1680 - 2009 Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
AS 1735Lifts, Escalators and Moving Walks
AS 1670.4 - 2004Fire detection system design, installation and
commissioning - Sound Systems and Intercom Systems for emergency purposes
AS 4428.4Fire detection, warning, control and intercom systems - Control and indicating equipment - Intercommunication systems for emergency purposes
AS 60118.4Design for magnetic field strength in Audio - frequency induction loops for hearing purposes
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information

First aid rooms

First aid rooms should be available for use by everyone. Access to any first aid equipment and other fixtures, such as basins, change tables or toilets is necessary. A supply of hot and cold water is important.

Where possible, a first aid room should be located close to toilets and change rooms.

The following key requirements and access dimensions for first aid rooms must be read in conjunction with key requirements and key access dimensions for all buildings and all installations.

Key requirements

  • A continuous accessible path of travel from the site entry to and through any first aid room.
  • Clear, easy to read signage at the entry to the first aid room incorporating relevant international symbols of access or deafness, that can easily be read by a person when standing or seated and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Clear, concise signage with a large size number or name at the entrance to the first aid room.
  • Wide waiting areas outside the first aid room to enable people to wait outside without interrupting the flow of pedestrian traffic through the rest of the building.
  • A low height bench and sink (if installed in the first aid room) that incorporates appropriate leg clearance underneath.
  • Lever or sensor operated taps in any wet areas.
  • Hot and cold water facilities (provided through a mixing spout) that can be used by a person when standing or seated.
  • Access to appropriate toilets for all users including people with mobility challenges, for example, ambulant and unisex accessible toilets.

Key access dimensions

  • A continuous accessible pedestrian path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • A minimum 850mm clear opening width at doorways with circulation space provided at both sides that considers angles of approach.
  • Tables that are of varying heights 730 - 870mm above floor level with appropriate leg clearance underneath.
  • Sink 770 - 800mm high with 640 - 650mm leg clearance underneath
  • Hot and cold water facilities with highest operable components at 900 - 1100mm (delivered through a mixing spout for easy regulation of temperature).
  • Seating with backs and armrests (220 - 300mm above the seat) at a height of 350mm - suitable for children, 450mm - general public use, 520mm - for older
  • adults).
  • Appropriate reach ranges and controls in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.

Table 11: Relevant Australian Standards for first aid rooms

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information

Fire extinguishers and alarms

The following key requirements and key access dimensions for fire extinguishers and alarms must be considered in addition to those for all installations.

Key requirements

  • Emergency management plan installed at a height that can be read by a person when standing or seated, and incorporates information, (including international symbols of access or deafness where relevant), regarding continuous accessible paths of travel to nominated emergency assembly areas for all people.
  • Visible and audible emergency alarms.
  • Variety of fire extinguishers for range of emergency situations.
  • Various size fire extinguishers for ease of use by all people.
  • Emergency alarms that can be activated without the need for excessive force.
  • Personal emergency alarms for any staff working in a building who may not be able to easily operate fire extinguishers or fixed alarms.

Key access dimensions

  • Appropriate reach ranges and controls in accordance with Australian Standards.

Table 12: Relevant Australian Standards for fire extinguishers and alarms

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Material

 AS 3745 - 2010

Planning for emergencies in facilities

Links to other relevant information

Emergency exits

Key requirements

  • Continuous accessible path of travel to and through all buildings and facilities leading to a nominated emergency assembly area.
  • Clear access to emergency exit doors free of any obstructions.
  • Appropriate emergency exit signs at doors and additional low level emergency exit signs that can still be seen in the event of rising smoke.
  • Supplementary directional signage (illuminated as appropriate) to assist in identifying emergency exits.
  • Path surfaces at exit points that are of a different colour, texture or material to assist people with recognition.
  • Audible and visible emergency alarms throughout all buildings and facilities.
  • Controls on emergency alarms that can be activated by a person who is standing or seated and used with a closed fist or open palm and incorporating raised tactile and Braille elements.
  • Easy to reach and use fire extinguishers.
  • A clearly signed accessible alternative to any lift, in the event of a lift breakdown or inability to use lifts in an emergency.
  • A place of refuge on levels above ground for a person with limited mobility.
  • If more than one level, a stairway (within or associated with any building) that is reserved for emergency exit.
  • Availability of emergency evacuation chair for use by people with limited mobility.
  • A sprinkler system that covers all spaces within any building.
  • Details of people who may require assistance in an emergency, available to building fire warden.
  • Emergency evacuation plans that can be read by a person when standing or seated and identifying the location of accessible paths of travel to nominated assembly areas for both ambulant and non ambulant users.
  • Emergency procedures provided in a variety of formats, incorporating international symbols of access or deafness where relevant, for example, large print, tactile, Braille.
  • Consistent and even lighting (reflected downward - without pooling or providing glare) and signage along pathways or corridors to any emergency exit and assembly area.
  • Lighting at the exit that has a higher lux level than the surrounding lighting to assist with identification and safety.

Key access dimensions

  • A continuous accessible path of travel that is a minimum of 2000mm high (1980mm at doorways) and 1000mm wide to exits.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • A minimum 850mm clear opening width at exits with circulation space on both sides, that considers angles of approach and incorporates level landings (including the operative leaf of a multiple leaf door).
  • Maximum rise of 35mm, 280mm length and gradient of 1:8 at any threshold ramps.
  • Step ramps to meet circulation spaces and angles of approach at doorways in accordance with the range in Australian Standards.
  • Solid strip a minimum of 75mm wide installed with the lower edge at a height of 900 - 1000mm above floor level across the width of any fully glazed door.
  • A preferred maximum force of 20N at the exit door handle to open doors and door closers that are adjustable.
  • D or D type lever style door handles on any doors requiring handles at 900 - 1100mm high.
  • Push button controls that are a minimum of 25m diameter and sit proud of the wall surface.
  • Door controls and switches that need to be grasped or turned at 900 - 1100mm high.
  • Door controls that only need to be touched at a height of 900 - 1250mm and not less than 500mm from an internal corner.
  • Door controls that only need to be pushed, for example, panic bars on egress routes at a height of 900 - 1200mm.
  • Door controls that are manually operated for power operated exit doors, at a height of 900 - 1100mm, no closer than 500mm from an internal corner.
  • Door handles with 35mm and not more than 45mm clearance between the handle (in the centre) and the back plate or door face.
  • A pull bar or handrail at a height of between 900 - 1100mm on any outward opening door that is not self closing.
  • Sliding exit door handles a minimum of 60mm from the door jamb or door stop when closed / open.
  • Snibs with a lever handle a minimum of 45mm from the centre of the spindle.
  • Minimum 35mm wide buttons or switches for exit controls, proud of surrounding surfaces.
  • A minimum distance of 1450mm between exit doorways within an airlock or vestibule, plus the door leaf width if the door opens into the space
  • Fire extinguishers and fire alarms that are located so the operable component is within appropriate reach ranges in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Appropriate reach ranges and controls in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Minimum 30% luminance contrast between doors, doorway, controls and background and adjacent surfaces.
  • Signage installed within appropriate ‘Zones for Viewing’ in accordance with Australian Standards.
  • Lighting installed to required lux levels in accordance with Australian Standards.

Table 12: Relevant Australian Standards for emergency exits

NumberTitle
AS 1428.1 – 2009Design for access and mobility - General Requirements for Access - New Building Work
AS 1428.2 - 1992Design for access and mobility - Enhanced and Additional Requirements - Buildings and Facilities
AS 1680 - 2009Interior Lighting - Safe Movement
AS/NZS 1158 Set:2010Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
AS 4586 - 2013Slip Resistance Classification of New Pedestrian Surface Materials
AS 1670.4 - 2004Fire detection system design, installation and 
commissioning - Sound Systems and Intercom Systems for Emergency Purposes
AS 2293.1 - 2005Emergency escape lighting and exit signs for buildings - System Design, Installation and Operation
AS 4428.4 -2004Fire detection, warning, control and intercom systems - Control and Indicating Equipment - Intercommunication Systems for Emergency Purposes
Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010

Links to other relevant information